February 10, 2012; Cleveland, OH, USA: Cleveland Cavaliers small forward Alonzo Gee (33) defends against Milwaukee Bucks power forward Drew Gooden (0) during the game at Quicken Loans Arena. Mandatory Credit: Eric P. Mull-USPRESSWIRE

Random Geeky Musings/Links on a Big Friday for the Bucks

Drew, Drew, Drew: Drew Gooden is a small forward trapped in a power forward’s body who nobly plays center to best help his team despite secretly wishing to be a point guard.

For the season (according to Hoopdata), Gooden is attempting 4.3 shots per game from a distance of 16 to 23 feet, and making 2.0 of them (43%).  While that mark doesn’t put him in Dirk Nowitzki territory (51% for the season), it does keep him in line with other jump-shooting bigs like LaMarcus Aldridge, Carlos Boozer, and Chris Bosh.

On the other hand, when it comes to his defense…  (**cough, cough**): http://www.nba.com/advancedstats

Sharing the Ball:  In my personal opinion the 1986 Boston Celtics were the greatest passing team of all time.  Between Larry Bird, Dennis Johnson, and Bill Walton, the ball would literally fly around the court to the open player.  In that season, the greatest number of assists the team had in any game was 34.  The Bucks had 38 assists against the Cavs Wednesday.

The Monta Experience:  Perhaps the best postscript to Monta Ellis’ career in Oakland this week came from Eric Freeman.  I can’t recommend it highly enough. Here’s a sample, but go to The Classical for the whole piece:

That’s not to say that Monta was miscast in Oakland, or that a fresh start will renew his career. NBA observers know that Ellis is a flawed player, a pass-third guard who needs to handle the ball as much as possible, struggles to move laterally on defense, and tends to take poor shots in crunch time. His usefulness is as yet undetermined: he’s a very talented player, but not effective enough for a team to organize itself around his flaws. He seems like the kind of player destined to play on mediocre teams for his entire career, a scorer just good enough to become part of All-Star discussion without ever being selected for the team itself.

Ellis is compelling because he momentarily renders those very legitimate concerns insignificant in the moment. He has been my favorite player since 2006, yet even I don’t make excuses for his inefficient production or seeming inability to alter his game to suit the needs of the team. He’s special not because of a particular skill, but for his ability to do something so unexpected that basketball logic seems like an insignificant arbiter of his value. He will dunk on Leandro Barbosa during what seems like a standard 3-on-1 break, or finish a 360 lay-up between two defenders when seeking out a foul would have been the safer bet.

The context of his career doesn’t give meaning to his talent—it obscures it. Unlike Allen Iverson, there’s no sense that his peak performance proves something about his toughness and will to win. Fans marvel at his body control, but praising it as a basketball skill is like calling someone the MVP of yoga. Ellis is a perfect fit for the Twitter era, a pure scorer whose stardom is defined by instantaneous reaction to his highlights rather than what he does to help a team win. At his best, he does so many amazing things in such quick succession that the only acceptable reactions are to squeal and laugh.

Contract Stuffing Data: Among players with more than 500 points and less than 100 three-point attempts, Ersan Ilyasova is one of the most efficient scorers in the league (by offensive efficiency rating, an estimate of points scored per 100 possessions):

Totals Shooting
Rk Player Tm MP FG FGA 3P 3PA FT FTA PTS FG% 3P% FT% ORtg
1 LeBron James MIA 1541 417 763 36 87 264 344 1134 .547 .414 .767 120
2 Ersan Ilyasova MIL 1140 197 414 29 69 99 122 522 .476 .420 .811 116
3 Paul Millsap UTA 1319 269 542 5 24 123 151 666 .496 .208 .815 115
4 Rodney Stuckey DET 1200 196 436 23 63 208 248 623 .450 .365 .839 115
5 Dwyane Wade MIA 1073 294 575 6 26 169 209 763 .511 .231 .809 114
6 Marcin Gortat PHO 1424 287 512 0 1 115 175 689 .561 .000 .657 113
7 LaMarcus Aldridge POR 1466 358 704 1 9 166 206 883 .509 .111 .806 112
8 Andrew Bynum LAL 1407 280 485 0 2 133 205 693 .577 .000 .649 112
9 Pau Gasol LAL 1608 290 579 3 16 131 168 714 .501 .188 .780 111
10 Blake Griffin LAC 1535 362 677 1 8 170 309 895 .535 .125 .550 111
11 Kris Humphries NJN 1430 212 427 0 0 136 186 560 .496 .731 111
12 Tony Parker SAS 1341 300 630 12 40 172 213 784 .476 .300 .808 111
13 Thaddeus Young PHI 1191 241 483 0 3 78 101 560 .499 .000 .772 111
14 Marc Gasol MEM 1561 236 483 1 9 162 212 635 .489 .111 .764 110
15 Al Jefferson UTA 1319 330 682 1 3 99 127 760 .484 .333 .780 110
16 David Lee GSW 1428 304 595 0 2 137 176 745 .511 .000 .778 110
17 Greg Monroe DET 1398 286 557 0 0 143 186 715 .513 .769 110
18 Carlos Boozer CHI 1338 310 587 0 1 69 97 689 .528 .000 .711 108
19 Chris Bosh MIA 1377 271 558 7 27 155 189 704 .486 .259 .820 108
20 Mike Conley MEM 1415 193 444 33 97 87 101 506 .435 .340 .861 108
Provided by Basketball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/16/2012.

Next Bucks Game Full schedule »
Wednesday, Oct 2929 Oct7:00at Charlotte HornetsBuy Tickets

Tags: Drew Gooden Ersan Ilyasova Milwaukee Bucks Monta Ellis

comments powered by Disqus