Oct 22, 2012; Toronto, ON, Canada; Milwaukee Bucks point guard Brandon Jennings (3) against the Toronto Raptors at the Air Canada Centre. The Raptors beat the Bucks 104-95. Mandatory Credit: Tom Szczerbowski-US PRESSWIRE

Milwaukee Bucks Links: Right Your Own Destiny Edition


Bucksketball:  Brandon Jennings likely won’t be extended before October 31st.  There are less than 30 hours until the deadline kicks in.  All signs point to the Bucks passing on their chance to lock up Brandon to an extension.

Jennings will still be a restricted free agent, so when other teams have the chance to pursue him this offseason, the Bucks will have a chance to decide if its worth their while to match.

Another factor that could keep him around:  Many of the players from the 2009 draft class who will go into restricted free agency this summer are point guards.  A minor glut could help the Bucks keep the cost of signing Brandon down. But…

NBA.com:  The best point guard of the Class of 2009, Ty Lawson, signed on to stay in Denver.

The Denver Nuggets kept guard Ty Lawson off the 2013 market Tuesday by agreeing with the fourth-year guard on a four-year, $48 million extension, according to league sources.

Lawson is only the second member of the 2009 Draft class to agree on an extension with his team before Wednesday’s deadline for those fourth-year players to get new deals.

Make no mistake about it:  Lawson has produced in Denver far more than Jennings has produced in Milwaukee.  But the difference isn’t overwhelming, so if Lawson is worth $12 million per year, it would surprise me if Jennings lands somewhere in the $9 to 10 million range — whether it be from an offer from the Bucks or some other team this summer.  Only Blake Griffin and Ty Lawson have signed so far (with James Harden soon to be next), so the Jennings’ cohort is largely in limbo.

Fox Sports Wisconsin: Ryan Kartje takes a feature-length look at what motivates Jennings, going back to his early childhood days in Gardena, California.

He liked the pressure. He liked being smaller than everyone else because it gave him a chance to prove people wrong. And he did so consistently. But it was a few years later that everything would change, where the pressure would multiply.

When Jennings’ father committed suicide just a few years after his debut at Rowley Park, the young boy suddenly became the man of the house, a role he took very seriously. And it changed him on the court, even as a young boy. He started crafting his game after the NBA players he could most relate to — Kobe Bryant and Allen Iverson, players who confronted doubt and pressure head on every day. They embraced it, and so would he. At 12 years old, he decided basketball would be the best way to provide for his family.

The doubts drove him. Soon, his cousins refused to play with him anymore. His handles were too good. His trash talk was top-notch. He got inside of his opponents’ heads.

Grantland:  Zach Lowe loves him some Larry Sanders.  He lavishes Larry with high praise in a recent Grantland column:

Larry Sanders is going to make his mark on this calendar year, somehow, some way. This dude just has a noisy game, and if he doesn’t get to show it in Milwaukee’s crowded frontcourt, look for some smart team to snap him up and find a role for him either midseason or over the summer. He has been a fringe rotation guy for most of his two seasons in the league, but when he gets on the floor, Sanders blocks everything in sight and figures into the calculus of every opponent possession.

Lowe knows his stuff, so Sanders really has some value.  His work in the preseason games showed the best side of Larry — hustling, blocking a ton of shots on defense, working the offensive side with tip-ins and easy baskets.  I’m still of the opinion that last year’s backup frontcourt from the end of the year — Sanders and Ekpe Udoh — can produce at a near-elite level as for a backup duo.  Ask Chicago how valuable having that kind of tandem can be.

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